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Outdoor Games for Brownies in built-up areas. Cobden of Cambridge. 20 pp. Cambridge, 1992.

PREFACE

This book is intended to complement the Games, Singing Games, Promise and Law and Handcraft books already published, by providing ideas for the more thoughtful and mentally-older children which many Packs now contain. Many of the suggestions are easy to adapt to different circumstances, e.g. those based on a hymn or poem, hunts and collections.

Planning:

When planning Meetings, it is important to keep a balanced programme. Not all these activities can be used in one year. Of a similar pair one can be used in one year, the other in the next. One Six Competition a year is usually enough. Two Theme Meetings in the winter terms work well, and so do 5 - 6 Wide Games in summer (provided the games are of contrasting types).

The choice should also take account of the preferences of the Brownies present in any year. Some love hunts and collections, and 3 long and 3 short, spread out over the year, are very successful. Others dislike these, and one in the year teaches the basic skills without causing boredom. A Pack tired of "Collect 6 different coloured petals, etc." can be fascinated by illustrating a verse of a poem with objects from nature, which involves much the same collecting.

Timing:

Timing must be considered before using the Theme Meetings, Six Competitions and Wide Games described here. Meetings are not all the same length, Guiders vary in how much time they spend on other parts of the Meeting, and Brownies differ in the duration of their interest in a continuing competition. When in doubt, shorten.

Most of these activities are for Sixes working separately. This trains the Sixer in leadership, the Six in team work and organisation (and in how to win and lose) and the Pack in high-level achievement. However, Six activities also increase exclusiveness and competitiveness and decrease Pack co-operation, so Singing Games, General Games, etc. are needed to balance the programme.

For new Guiders using this book:

Think a complex activity through thoroughly before the Brownie Meeting. There will then be no difficulty in teaching it to the Brownies.

To save space, full details are not given where these are obvious or easily invented.

Marking:

Marking should be planned. Sixes can add up their own points when written work is involved. When points awarded can be forgotten, some object such as a coloured spill can be given for each point (spills are referred to in the book, but anything similar would do as well). Points should always be counted, and praise given at the end of any activity for which these are relevant. Also where relevant, there should be a talk or discussion on the subject. This should be SHORT, ensuring that the Pack knows the meaning of what they have been doing. Winners of Six Competitions should receive something small but tangible, e.g. something to sew on the Six sheet, the loan of the Pack Shield, etc. Wherever relevant, Sixers should be given in writing, lists of what they should do.

CONTENTS
Preface
Theme Meetings
Wide Games
Nature Games
Other Games
Six Competitions
Badge-work Activities
Promise and Law Activities
Ideas for Ceremonies etc.
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